FANDOM



Nytyx LFS Edit

source mage Edit

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Source_Mage

http://scmweb.sourcemage.org/?p=smgl/grimoire/games.git;a=blame;f=games-utils/mumble/BUILD;hb=922dd677b15cfc09cdba193fb73c303f2c8ff4d2

http://scmweb.sourcemage.org/?p=smgl/grimoire/games.git;a=blob;f=games-simulation/flightgear/DEPENDS;h=9720f95c4bb8d0b170d4c4aba2f97d564731e50e;hb=6f34921c46fda2f358b6ddb9a6ce4f1a818929f0 flightgear dependency list

http://www.gobolinux.org Edit

Gobolinux

ycombinator Edit

Apparently the real troubles came when trying to get a DE going.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zNLYanJAQ3s yocto

http://wiki.linuxfromscratch.org/alfs/ automated build .

https://www.lfscript.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

http://robin.radic.nl/linux-from-scratch/

github Edit

https://github.com/Rocla/lfs-7.8

http://www.intestinate.com/pilfs/ raspberry

1 Edit

http://www.pengutronix.de/software/ptxdist/index_en.html build from sources

kegel.com Edit

http://kegel.com/crosstool/ GCC build script automation , http://kegel.com/crosstool/current/doc/chroot-login-howto.html

http://www.batbox.org/wrt54g.html Then I configured Snort like so : "./configure -host=mips --with-libpcap-libraries=$PCAP --with-libpcap-includes=$PCAP" where PCAP pointed to the directory where I built libpcap. I futzed with the Makefile a bit to make sure it pointed to the correct cross-compilation tools and to do a static link.

http://www.barebox.org/ u-boot extension'

http://lwn.net/Articles/85865/ A stage-three Gentoo system has all the basics for which there is little choice, but remains barely functional, not even including a syslogger, as there are several choices available. However, this is where life gets interesting, as one can begin to make choices on packages, not just the features to include on packages that MUST be installed. This is where Linux from Scratch and other basic systems leave off, but it's where Gentoo really begins, as one now chooses the packages for the rest of their system, and compiles and installs them, using Gentoo's source based but automated and dependency checked Portage build system, with its two base commands, emerge, which does the high-level stuff such as dependency checking, and ebuild, generally called by emerge, but also usable on its own, to fetch, unpack, configure, compile, and install, individual packages. The latter command, ebuild, is especially useful for those wishing to do additional customization either to the applied patches, or to the configure and compile, before installation.


pengutronix Edit

http://www.pengutronix.de/software/ptxdist/index_en.html PTXdist is no distribution: our experience is that binary distributions are too inflexible for embedded systems. That's why PTXdist builds the target system directly from the original sources. PTXdist is considered to be "executable documentation", which means that the steps necessary to build a target system are put into scripts which can be easily reviewed, but also executed with one click by a less experienced user.


qt5 Edit

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install libssl-dev

  • ./configure -c++std c++11 -static -release -platform linux-g++-64 -prefix /home/someuser/Qt/StaticRelease58 -qt-zlib -qt-pcre -qt-libpng -qt-libjpeg -qt-freetype -qt-xcb -make libs -openssl-linked -nomake tools -nomake examples -nomake tests -opensource -confirm-license -skip qtwayland -skip qtwebview -skip qtwebengine -skip qtwebchannel -no-qml-debug


Gcc compiler Edit


William von Hagen. The definitive guide to gcc. If you cannot use primary GCC command-line options to “do the right thing” when invoking commercial or other non-GCC toolchain components, you may be able to modify environment variables in your Makefile to add new command-line options to those passed to the appropriate tool during the compilation process. If you are using GNU make, each of the components in the GCC toolchain (preprocessor, assembler, linker) has a corresponding FLAGS environment variable (ASFLAGS, LDFLAGS, CPPFLAGS) that can be set in your Makefiles in order to specify command-line options that are always supplied to the appropriate tool. If you are not using GNU make, your version of the make program does not support these flags.

Libraries have been installed in: /usr/lib

If you ever happen to want to link against installed libraries in a given directory, LIBDIR, you must either use libtool, and specify the full pathname of the library, or use the '-LLIBDIR' flag during linking and do at least one of the following:

  - add LIBDIR to the 'LD_LIBRARY_PATH' environment variable
    during execution
  - add LIBDIR to the 'LD_RUN_PATH' environment variable
    during linking
  - use the '-Wl,-rpath -Wl,LIBDIR' linker flag
  - have your system administrator add LIBDIR to '/etc/ld.so.conf'

See any operating system documentation about shared libraries for more information, such as the ld(1) and ld.so(8) manual pages.

links Edit

https://www.sourceware.org/ml/crossgcc/2016-09/


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